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<!DOCTYPE HTML PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 3.2//EN">
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<head>
<title>DHCP Manager Help: Configuring DHCP Server</title>
<meta NAME="AUTHOR" CONTENT="smorgan">
<meta NAME="KEYWORDS" CONTENT="DHCP">

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	<td colspan=1 valign="top" WIDTH="105">
	<P>&nbsp;</P>
	<STRONG><A HREF="dhcp_main_top.html">Overview</A></STRONG><P>
	<STRONG><A HREF="dhcp_relay_ref.html">Servers and Relays</A></STRONG><BR>
	<IMG SRC="art/tip2.gif" WIDTH=12 HEIGHT=10 BORDER=0 ALT="">DHCP Config<BR>
	&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;<A HREF="#store"><EM>Data Store</EM></A><BR>
   &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;<A HREF="#dspath"><EM>Path</EM></A><BR>
   &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;<A HREF="#hostnmserv"><EM>Hosts Name Service</EM></A><BR>
	&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;<A HREF="#lease"><EM>Lease Policy</EM></A><BR>
	&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;<A HREF="#dns"><EM>DNS Domain/Server</EM></A><BR>
	&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;<A HREF="#net"><EM>Network</EM></A><BR>
	&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;<A HREF="#router"><EM>Router</EM></A><BR>
	&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;<A HREF="#nis"><EM>NIS</EM></A><BR>
	&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;<A HREF="#nisplus"><EM>NIS+</EM></A><BR>
	&nbsp;&nbsp;<A HREF="dhcp_relay_config.html">Relay Config</A><BR>
	&nbsp;&nbsp;<A HREF="dhcp_net_wiz.html">Network Config</A><BR>
	&nbsp;&nbsp;<A HREF="dhcp_server_serv.html">DHCP Services</A><BR>
	&nbsp;&nbsp;<A HREF="dhcp_relay_serv.html">Relay Services</A><P>
	<A HREF="dhcp_addr_ref.html"><STRONG>Addresses</STRONG></A><P>
	<A HREF="dhcp_macro_ref.html"><STRONG>Macros</STRONG></A><P>
	<A HREF="dhcp_option_ref.html"><STRONG>Options</STRONG></A><P>		
	<A HREF="dhcp_main_how.html"><STRONG>How To..</STRONG></A><P>
	<A HREF="dhcp_main_menus.html"><STRONG>Menus</STRONG></A><P>
<A HREF="dhcp_main_idx.html"><STRONG>Index</STRONG></A>
	
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<P>&nbsp;</P>


<H1>DHCP Configuration Wizard</H1>

The DHCP Configuration Wizard helps you configure a Solaris<small><sup>TM</sup></small>
system to be a DHCP server and configures the first network.  <P>
<TABLE WIDTH="500" BORDER="1" CELLSPACING="2" CELLPADDING="2" VALIGN="TOP" BORDERCOLOR="#CCCCCC" BGCOLOR="#DEDEDE">
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<TD><STRONG>Note: </STRONG>Please read the "Planning for DHCP Service" chapter in the Solaris <em>DHCP Administration Guide, </em> before configuring a DHCP server.  
</TD></TR>
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<P>
After initial configuration, use the Modify option in the <A HREF="dhcp_server_serv.html">Services</A>
menu to configure services such as BOOTP compatibility, duplicate address detection,
and which interfaces to monitor.<P>
To enter information in the wizard, double-click in the field, enter the desired value, and then press Enter.<P>
The DHCP Configuration Wizard, asks you to supply the following information.
<P><HR NOSHADE><P>

<table border=0 cellspacing=4 cellpadding=3 width=490>
	<tr>
	<td width=125 valign="top"><A NAME="store"><STRONG>Data Store </STRONG></A><br>
	</td>
	<td valign="top">Select the type of data store the DHCP server will use to 
	store configuration data. The choices are:

<table cellspacing=3 cellpadding=3>
		<tr>
		<td width=90 valign="top"><em>Text files</em></td>
		<td valign="top">Data is stored in clear text ASCII files. Suitable for small number of clients, up to 10,000. Data can be shared through NFS among several DHCP servers.</td>
		</tr>
<tr>
		<td width=90 valign="top"><em>NIS+</em></td>
		<td valign="top">Data is stored in NIS+ tables. Suitable for medium to large numbers of clients, up to 40,000. Data can be shared among several DHCP servers.  If the server is not already configured as a NIS+ client, you cannot select the NIS+ option.  To use NIS+ as a data store, cancel the wizard, configure the server as a NIS+ client, and run DHCP Manager again.</td>
		</tr>
<tr>
		<td width=90 valign="top"><em>Binary files</em></td>
		<td valign="top">Data is stored in binary text files. Suitable for large numbers of clients up to 100,000. Data can <em>not</em> be shared among several DHCP servers. </td>
		</tr>
</table>
</td>
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	<tr>
<td width=125 valign="top"><A NAME="dspath"><STRONG>Data store path</STRONG></A><br>
</td>
<td>If you chose text files or binary files as your data store, enter the path to the 
	data (default=<tt>/var/dhcp</tt>).<p>
	If you chose NIS+, enter the domain of the NIS+ server (default=this server's domain). <P> </td></tr>

	
<tr>
	<td width=125 valign="top"><A NAME="hostnmserv"><STRONG>Hosts name service</STRONG></A><br>
	</td>
	<td valign="top">Select the name service that the DHCP server should use to register host names associated with IP addresses that it allocates to clients. 
 <table cellspacing=3 cellpadding=3>
		<tr>
		<td width=90 valign="top"><em>Do not manage hosts records</em></td>
		<td valign="top">The DHCP server will not attempt to add host name entries to any name service. An administrator should add the names manually to a name service. </td>
		</tr>
<tr>
		<td width=90 valign="top"><em>/etc/hosts</em></td>
		<td valign="top">The DHCP server will add host name entries to the servers /etc/hosts table. </td>
		</tr>
<tr>
		<td width=90 valign="top"><em>NIS+</em></td>
		<td valign="top">The DHCP server will add host name entries to NIS+.  The DHCP server system must be a NIS+ client. You must supply the NIS+ domain name. </td>
		</tr>
<tr>
		<td width=90 valign="top"><em>DNS</em></td>
		<td valign="top">The DHCP server will add host name entries to DNS if the DHCP daemon and DNS daemon are running on the same system.  You must supply the DNS domain name. </td>
		</tr>
</table>

	</td> 
	</tr>
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	<tr>
	<td width=125 valign="top"><A NAME="lease"><STRONG>Lease Policy</STRONG></A><br>
	</td>
	<td valign="top">Enter the length of time before a lease expires. 
	The lease is the amount of time a DHCP server grants
	permission to a DHCP client to use a particular address. 
	You can enter from 1 hour to 3550 weeks. <P>
	The lease time value should be relatively small, so that expired addresses
are reclaimed quickly, but large enough so that if your DHCP service becomes
unavailable, the clients continue to function until the machine(s) running
the DHCP service can be repaired.  A rule of thumb is to specify a time that
is two times the predicted down time of a server. For example, if it generally
takes four hours to obtain and replace a defective part and reboot the server,
you should specify a lease time of eight hours. <P> 
	The default is to allow a client to renegotiate the lease before it expires.
	A Solaris DHCP client will try to renew the lease when it is halfway
	through the lease period. <P> 
	If not allowed to renegotiate, clients must issue a new DHCP request 
    in order to obtain a
	new address when the lease expires. You may choose this option
	in an environment where there are more clients than there are
	addresses, and you need to enforce a time limit on the use of an IP
	address.  
	</td> 
	</tr>
	
	<tr>
	<td width=125 valign="top"><A NAME="dns"><STRONG>DNS Domain</STRONG></A></td>
	<td valign="top">The domain server resolves host names to host 
	addresses. If the server is configured to use DNS, the domain name and address 
	of the DNS server will be displayed.
	If the fields are empty, you can enter the domain name and address of a
	DNS domain server. <p>
	You can enter the address of more than one server. The order in the list 
	determines the order in which the servers are queried.
	</td> 	

	</tr>
	<TR><TD COLSPAN="2">&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;<A HREF="#top"><small>return to top</small></A></TD></TR>

	</table>

<HR noshade size=2>
	

<strong><A NAME="net"><big>Network Configuration</big></A></STRONG><P>
This section begins the network configuration.
You can configure the first network using the DHCP Configuration Wizard. Once
the DHCP server is configured, you can add additional networks using the Network Wizard, which is available from the Edit menu, when the Address view is displayed.<P>

	<table border=0 cellspacing=4 cellpadding=3 width=490>
	<tr>
	<td width=125 valign="top"><A NAME="addr"><STRONG>Network Address</STRONG></A></td>
	<td valign="top">
	Enter the IP address of the network you are configuring.<p>
	</td>
	</tr>
	
		<tr>
	<td width=125 valign="top"><A NAME="info"><STRONG>Subnet Mask</STRONG></A><br></td>
	<td valign="top">
		Enter the subnet mask for this network. A subnet mask is a way of dividing 
	up the host portion of an Internet address to form local subnetworks.
	</TD></TR>

	<tr>
	<td width=125 valign="top"><A NAME="info"><STRONG>Network Type</STRONG></A><br></td>
	<td valign="top">
	Specify whether the network is a local area network (LAN) or point-to-point (PPP).<p>


	</TD>
	</tr>

	<tr>
	<td width=125 valign="top"><A NAME="router"><STRONG>Routing</STRONG></A></td>
	<td valign="top">A router is a machine with multiple network 
	interfaces that can forward IP packets from one network to
	another. In most cases, your clients should use router discovery to 
	connect to a router. If you have clients in your network that cannot 
	use router discovery, enter the IP address of a router which
	they can use to communicate with systems on another network.
	</td>
	</tr>

	
	<tr>
	<td width=125 valign="top"><A NAME="nis"><STRONG>NIS Domain Name</STRONG></A><br>
	<STRONG>NIS Server Address</STRONG></td>
	<td valign="top">If the server is configured to use NIS naming service, 
	the NIS server information will be filled in.  If not, you can enter the domain 
	name and IP address of one or more NIS name servers.<P>

	The order in which the address appears in the list determines the order in
	which the servers are queried.
	</td> 
	</tr>

	<tr>
	<td width=125 valign="top"><A NAME="nisplus"><STRONG>NIS+ Domain Name</STRONG></A><br>
	<STRONG>NIS+ Server Address</STRONG></td>
	<td valign="top">If the server is configured to use NIS+ name service, 
	the NIS+ server information will be filled in.  If not, you can enter 
	the domain name and IP address of one or more NIS+ name servers.<P>
	The order in which the address appears in the list determines the order in
	which the servers are queried.
	</td>  		

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